Skip to main content
Add Me To Your Mailing List
Simsbury Free Library
749 Hopmeadow Street
P.O.Box 484
Simsbury, CT 06070
Hours:
Tuesdays and Thursdays
11:00 to 5:00
2nd and 4th Saturdays
10:00 to 2:00
860/408-1336

Email: simsburyfreelibrary@gmail.com
 
 
UPCOMING EVENTS   
 

 

To make a reservation or for more info,

call 860-408-1336

or email simsburyfreelibrary@gmail.com.


 
 
Genealogy Road Show with Diane LeMay

 

January 23rd, February 13th and 27th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

If you are researching your family tree, but don't know where else to look to find missing ancestors, bring in your tree.  Genealogy librarian Diane LeMay can help with deciphering handwriting, online research, Massachusetts and French-Canadian research, and much more.  RSVPs recommended.

 
Free to members, $5 for non-members.  
 
 
Drop In Book Club 
 

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016, 11:15 a.m.

From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instantNew York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.


Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

Doerr’s “stunning sense of physical detail and gorgeous metaphors” (San Francisco Chronicle) are dazzling. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, he illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another. Ten years in the writing, a National Book Award finalist, All the Light We Cannot See is a magnificent, deeply moving novel from a writer “whose sentences never fail to thrill” (Los Angeles Times).

New members in search of great book discussions and even better company are always welcome at the SFL’s Drop In Book Club.  Readers are welcome any time they are interested in the SFL’s monthly book.  Past book discussions have included The boys in the Boat, Behind the Beautiful Forevers, and One Thousand White Women.  Free. For more info, call (860) 408-1338 or email simsburyfreelibrary@gmail.com.

 

Heublein Tower En Plein Air Art Reception

 

Thursday, February 25th, 2016 from 5-7 p.m.

Artwork painted at Heublein Tower’s second annual En Plein Air event in September 2015 will be on display at the SFL.  Come check out the beautiful paintings of Heublein Tower and the vistas beyond by artists Catherine Elliott, Deborah Leonard, Janet Iffland, Mandy Adendorff, Brian Colbath, Kate Tortland and Victor Legere.  All the paintings will be for sale and all proceeds go the Friends of Heublein Tower  for the ongoing restoration of the Heublein Tower.   Refreshments will be served.  Free.

 

 
 Add Row
 
 
 

 

Tuesday, May 20th, 1 p.m.
Connecticut History Talk with Tom Ratliff:  "Hartford from 1820-1920"
  
In this fifth and final lecture in his series exploring Connecticut's rich historical past, Tom Ratliff will talk about the period of rapid industrial growth and large-scale i
Tuesday, May 20th, 1 p.m.
Connecticut History Talk with Tom Ratliff:  "Hartford from 1820-1920"
  
In this fifth and final lecture in his series exploring Connecticut's rich historical past, Tom Ratliff will talk about the period of rapid industrial growth and large-scale i

DROP IN BOOK CLUB

 

Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell, Jr.
Tuesday, May 12th at 11:15 a.m.:  

 

From Booklist: What goes on behind closed doors, especially when those doors are of the gilded variety, has fascinated novelists and journalists for centuries. The private lives of the rich and famous are so tantalizing that Robin Leach made a career out of showcasing them. One of the biggest eccentric, rich fishes out there was Huguette Clark. Deceased for more than two years, Clark, brought to life by investigator Dedman and Clark’s descendant, Newell, owned nouveau riche palaces in New York, Connecticut, and California. An heiress, Clark disappeared from public view in the 1920s. What happened to her and her vast wealth? Answering this question is the book’s mission. Based on records and the hearsay of relations and former employees, the book pieces together Clarks life, that of a woman rumored to be institutionalized while her mansions stood empty, though immaculately maintained throughout her life. Clark left few clues about herself, but she willed vast sums to her caretakers and numerous charitable endeavors. Still, her absence acts as a shade to seeing her fully, hinting at possible financial malfeasance, all the while conspiring to produce a spellbinding mystery.


No need to join this book club.  Just drop in when you are in town or when the book is of interest.


DROP IN BOOK CLUB

 

Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell, Jr.
Tuesday, May 12th at 11:15 a.m.:  

 

From Booklist: What goes on behind closed doors, especially when those doors are of the gilded variety, has fascinated novelists and journalists for centuries. The private lives of the rich and famous are so tantalizing that Robin Leach made a career out of showcasing them. One of the biggest eccentric, rich fishes out there was Huguette Clark. Deceased for more than two years, Clark, brought to life by investigator Dedman and Clark’s descendant, Newell, owned nouveau riche palaces in New York, Connecticut, and California. An heiress, Clark disappeared from public view in the 1920s. What happened to her and her vast wealth? Answering this question is the book’s mission. Based on records and the hearsay of relations and former employees, the book pieces together Clarks life, that of a woman rumored to be institutionalized while her mansions stood empty, though immaculately maintained throughout her life. Clark left few clues about herself, but she willed vast sums to her caretakers and numerous charitable endeavors. Still, her absence acts as a shade to seeing her fully, hinting at possible financial malfeasance, all the while conspiring to produce a spellbinding mystery.


No need to join this book club.  Just drop in when you are in town or when the book is of interest.


 

BOOK OF WORLD WAR I LETTERS

WRITTEN BY SIMSBURY NATIVE

 

 

 

Thank you so much to Joe Hall (of Hall's Farm on Terry's Plain) for sharing his great uncle's World War I letters and allowing us to scan them.  If you are a Simsbury or WWI history buff, stop in and have a look at our book of 44 letters that George L. Hall sent home between August 11, 1917 and October 21, 1918. Sadly, George was killed in action on October 28th, 1918, just 2 weeks before the Germans surrendered.  

The letters are a great look at the life of a 20-21 year old soldier in World War I and there a number of Simsbury tidbits as well.  George mentions the other Simsbury boys he sees in France, asks his mother to send fruit cake, hard candies and American cigarettes and tobacco, mentions the Hartford Courant and the "Farmington Valley", talks about how he can't tell them much because of the censors (most of the letters have the censor's signature, and at least one letter has a word or phrase cut out), he asks his brother how the Simsbury football team is doing, and the Home Guard. 

We hope to have the letters available to view on our website in the near future. 

 
An Oral History with Thelma Hall
Thelma Hall

Interested in Simsbury's history? Our interview with Thelma Hall is now up on SCTV's website (simsburytv.org). Her daughter, Joanne Vanty, asked her questions about her nearly 90 years in Simsbury. Mrs. Hall has great memories of growing up in Simsbury: her father, the station master, walking to school in the snow and so much more. Check it out!  

Click here to see the interview.


 



 

PAST PROGRAMS

    

Did you know you can see some of our past programs on SCTV's website at simsburytv.org?  Click on any program on the right to view.